Conference on Violence on Campus:
Prediction, Prevention and Response

Speakers

 

Fagan

Jeffrey A. Fagan


Columbia Law School

Scott

Elizabeth Scott


Columbia Law School

Locke

Joanna Locke, MD, MPH


The Jed Foundation

Franke

Ann Franke


Wise Results, LLC.

Tribbensee

Nancy E. Tribbensee


Arizona Board of Regents

Eichler

Dr. Richard J. Eichler


Columbia University

Silverman

Morton M. Silverman, M.D.


National Suicide Prevention Technical Resource Center

Bonnie

Richard J. Bonnie


University of Virginia

Appelbaum

Paul S. Appelbaum, M.D.


Columbia University

Mulvey

Edward P. Mulvey


University of Pittsburgh

Information

Please click a participant's picture, to the left, in order to see that participant's Bio.

If you have yet to submit a photo and/or bio of yourself, please attach the missing information to an e-mail addressed to Kate Minette. Your information will be posted shortly after we receive it.

Jeffrey A. Fagan, Ph.D.

Professor of Law and Public Health at Columbia University
Director of the Center for Crime Community and Law at Columbia Law School

His research and scholarship focuses on crime, law and social policy. His current and recent research examines capital punishment, racial profiling, social contagion of violence, legal socialization of adolescents, the social geography of domestic violence, the jurisprudence of adolescent crime, drug control policy, and perceived legitimacy of the criminal law. He is a member of the National Consortium on Violence Research and the Working Group on Legitimacy and the Criminal Law of the Russell Sage Foundation. He formerly was Vice Chair of the Committee on Law and Justice of the National Academy of Science, and served as the Committee’s Vice Chair for the last two years. From 1996-2006, he was a member of the MacArthur Foundation's Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice. From 2002-2005, he was received an Investigator Award in Health Policy Research from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He was a Soros Senior Justice Fellow for 2005-6. From 1994-98, he served on the standing peer review panel (IRG) for violence research at the National Institute for Mental Health. He is past Editor of the Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, and serves on the editorial boards of several journals on criminology and law. He has served Executive Counselor on the Boards of both the American Society of Criminology and the Crime and Deviance Section of the American Sociological Association. He received the Bruce Stone Award from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. He is an elected Fellow of the American Society of Criminology.


Website: www.law.columbia.edu/fac/Jeffrey_Fagan
E-mail: jfagan@law.columbia.edu

Elizabeth Scott

Henry R. Media Professor of Law at Columbia University

Elizabeth Scott received a B.A. from the College of William and Mary in 1967 and J.D. from the University of Virginia in1977. She practiced law briefly after graduating from law school and then served as legal director of the Forensic Psychiatry Clinic, Institute of Law, Psychiatry and Public Policy at the University of Virginia from 1979-87. Scott served as Associate Professor at Virginia from 1988-91, University Professor from 1992-2006 and Class of 1962 Professor of Law from 2001-06. She visited at Columbia law school in 1987-88, 2001-02, 2003, and 2005, and joined the Columbia faculty as the Harold R. Medina Professor of Law in 2006. Scott teaches family law, property, criminal law, and children and the law. She has written extensively on marriage, divorce, cohabitation, child custody, adolescent decision-making, and juvenile delinquency. Her research is interdisciplinary, applying behavioral economics, social science research, and developmental theory to family/juvenile law and policy issues. She was the founder and co-director of the University of Virginia's interdisciplinary Center for Children, Families and the Law. Currently, Scott is involved in empirical research on adolescents in the justice system as a member of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice. She is the co-author, with Ira Ellman, Paul Kurtz, Lois Weithorn and Brian Bix of Family Law: Cases, Text, Problems (4th ed., 2004). She is also co-author, with Samuel Davis, Walter Wadlington, and Charles Whitebread of Children in the Legal System (3rd ed. 2004).


Website: www.law.columbia.edu/fac/Elizabeth_Scott
E-mail: escott@law.columbia.edu

Joanna Locke, MD, MPH

Executive Director, Programming - The Jed Foundation

Joanna Locke, MD, MPH, is Executive Director of Programming with The Jed Foundation, the nation’s leading organization focused on reducing the rate of suicide and the prevalence of emotional distress among college students. She is actively involved in all aspects of program planning and development, while also directly managing the organization’s programs targeted at colleges and universities. Dr. Locke is a national spokesperson for the Foundation, represents the organization as an advisor to multiple outside projects, and has presented at higher education and suicide prevention conferences across the country. She is also a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the SUNY Stony Brook School of Medicine. Dr. Locke earned her BA in English from the University of Maryland at College Park and both her MD and MPH degrees from the Tulane University Health Sciences Center. After completing an internship in psychiatry at the George Washington University Medical Center, she finished her residency at the SUNY Stony Brook School of Medicine in general preventive medicine and public health.


Website: work in progress...
E-mail: jlocke@jedfoundation.org

Anne Franke

Founder, Wise Results, LLC.

Ann Franke has 25 years’ experience with national trends in academic policy and education law. She consults nationally with colleges and universities on issues ranging from student injury to academic freedom. She founded her firm Wise Results, LLC, in 2005 after holding senior management positions with United Educators Insurance and the American Association of University Professors.


Ms. Franke speaks often to national groups, and the American Council on Education invited her to write a book on campus risk management, to appear in 2009. She has published in, among other periodicals, Trusteeship, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Change magazine, Minerva, and The Review of Litigation. She has also served as an expert witness. Ms. Franke is a fellow of the National Association of College and University Attorneys, a trustee of AAUP’s Academic Freedom Fund, and a member of the editorial advisory board for “Educator’s Guide to Controlling Sexual Harassment.”


Ms. Franke earned her B.A. (magna cum laude), M.A. (linguistics), and J.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and an LL.M. from Georgetown University. Through a Fulbright senior scholar award, she studied the development of private universities in Australia. Avocationally, she is an amateur cellist dedicated to chamber music. She resides in Washington DC.


Website: work in progress...
E-mail: frankealpert@verizon.net

Nancy E. Tribbensee

General Counsel for the Arizona University System

Nancy E. Tribbensee works for the Arizona Board of Regents as General Counsel for the Arizona University System. Prior to this appointment, she served as legal counsel for Arizona State University for 17 years. Her research areas include student privacy, mental health issues, student affairs, free speech, intellectual property, technology transfer, research compliance, and risk management. She is a board member of the National Association of College and University Attorneys (NACUA) and chair of the NACUA Strategic Planning Committee. She also sits on the Board of Directors for the Foothills Academy College Preparatory Charter School. Prior to joining Arizona State University, Nancy was an associate with the Evans, Kitchel, and Jenckes law firm in Phoenix, Arizona. She holds an M.A. and a B.A. in Philosophy, a J.D. and a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Arizona State University.


Website: work in progress...
E-mail: Nancy.Tribbensee@azregents.edu

Dr. Richard J. Eichler

Director, Counseling and Psychological Services at Columbia University

Dr. Richard J. Eichler is a clinical psychologist specializing in college mental health. He joined the staff of Counseling and Psychological Services at Columbia University in 1986 and has been its Director since 1992. He has taught undergraduate courses in Human Development at Columbia College, graduate courses in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and Developmental Psychopathology to doctoral candidates in Clinical and Counseling Psychology at Teachers College, and courses in Adolescent Development at the William Alanson White Institute. Dr. Eichler is a consultant to the College Mental Health section of the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry. He recently presented at the symposium “Privacy vs. Protection: The Case of College Student Suicide” sponsored by The Columbia University Center for Bioethics, the New York State Psychiatric Institute Suicide Intervention Center, and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and is a frequent speaker at conferences and community events on a range of other topics from adjusting to college to the social and emotional concomitants of learning disabilities. Most recently, he authored a chapter on developmental considerations in college counseling which appears in the text, College Mental Health Practice.


Website: www.health.columbia.edu/docs/about_us/organization/cps/eichler.html
E-mail: re1@columbia.edu

Morton M. Silverman, M.D.

Senior Advisor, National Suicide Prevential Technical Resource Center (SPRC)

Morton M. Silverman, M.D., currently is the Senior Advisor to the National Suicide Prevention Technical Resource Center (SPRC). From October, 2002 until January, 2003 he served as the Director of the SPRC. In October, 2002 the SPRC was established under a cooperative agreement between the Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to fulfill one of the objectives of the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (NSSP).


Dr. Silverman served as the first Chief of the Center for Prevention Research at the National Institute of Mental Health (1983-1985), and then served as the first Associate Administrator for Prevention in the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (1985-1987). From 1987-2002, he was an Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Associate Dean of Students in the University, and Director of the Student Counseling and Resource Service, all at the University of Chicago. He currently is a Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Chicago.


Dr. Silverman served as the Senior Scientific Editor and Writer for the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention: Goals and Objectives for Action (2001). He has been a consultant to the DHHS Federal Steering Group to implement the U.S. National Strategy. He serves as a Temporary Advisor to the Department of Mental Health and Substance Dependence of the World Health Organization and consults on the development of national suicide prevention programs. Since 1996, he has been the Editor-in-Chief of Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, the scientific journal of the American Association of Suicidology. In 2002 he became a member (elected) of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s (AFSP) Scientific Council. In addition he serves as a Senior Medical Advisor to The Jed Foundation (NYC), and Education Consultant to the Denver VA VISN 19 MIRECC, both focusing on suicide prevention.


Dr. Silverman is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, and a member of Division 27 of the American Psychological Association. He is the co-author or author of over 30 peer-reviewed publications, and over 25 book and monograph chapters on the topics of college student mental health, disease prevention, health promotion, alcohol and other drug abuse, suicide, and standards of care. He is the co-editor or co-author of 5 books on topics related to the field of suicidology, including The Comprehensive Textbook of Suicidology (2000), and Adolescent Suicide: Assessment and Intervention (2006). He is the 2005 recipient of the Louis I. Dublin Award from the American Association of Suicidology, for “outstanding service and contributions to the field of suicide prevention as evidenced by leadership, devotion and creativity.”


He received his undergraduate degree in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania (1969) and received his M.D. degree from Northwestern University in 1974. In 1978 he completed his residency training in Psychiatry at the University of Chicago.


Website: www.med.umich.edu/depression/bio/morton_silverman.htm
E-mail: msilverman@edc.org

Richard J. Bonnie

Harrison Foundation Professor of Medicine and Law
Professor of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Science
Director of the Institute of Law, Psychiatry and Public Policy at the University of Virginia


Mr. Bonnie is Harrison Foundation Professor of Medicine and Law, Professor of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Science, and Director of the Institute of Law, Psychiatry and Public Policy at the University of Virginia. He teaches and writes about criminal law, bioethics, and public policies relating to mental health, substance abuse, aging and public health.


Professor Bonnie has been actively involved in public service throughout his career. Among many other positions, he has been Associate Director of the National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse (1971 73); Secretary of the first National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse (1975-80); chair of Virginia's State Human Rights Committee responsible for protecting rights of persons with mental disabilities (1979-85), and chief advisor for the ABA Criminal Justice Mental Health Standards Project (1981-88). He is currently chairing a Commission on Mental Health Law Reform at the request of the Chief Justice of Virginia.


Professor Bonnie has served as an advisor to the American Psychiatric Association Council on Psychiatry and Law since 1979, received the APA's Isaac Ray Award in 1998 for contributions to forensic psychiatry, and was awarded a special presidential commendation in 2003 for his contributions to American psychiatry. He has also served on the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Mental Health and the Law (1988-96) and is currently¬ participating in the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Mandated Community Treatment and in a new MacArthur Foundation Initiative on Neuroscience and Law.


In 1991, Professor Bonnie was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, has chaired numerous Academy studies on subjects ranging from elder mistreatment to underage drinking, and just completed chairing a major IOM study on tobacco policy. He received the Yarmolinsky Medal in 2002 for his contributions to the IOM and the National Academies.


In 2007, Professor Bonnie received the University of Virginia’s highest honor, the Thomas Jefferson Award.


Website: www.law.virginia.edu/fac/rjb6f
E-mail: rbonnie@virginia.edu

Paul S. Appelbaum, M.D.


Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine and Law
Director, Division of Psychiatry, Law and Ethics at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons


Bio coming soon...


Website: http://asp.cumc.columbia.edu/facdb/profile_list.asp...
E-mail: psa21@columbia.edu

Edward P. Mulvey


Professor of Psychiatry
Director, Law & Psychiatry Research, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine


Edward P. Mulvey is a Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Law and Psychiatry Program at Western Psychiatry Institute and Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He received his B.A. in Psychology from Yale University in 1973, and his Ph.D. in Community/Clinical Psychology from the University of Virginia in 1982. He also did post-doctoral training in quantitative methods in criminal justice at Carnegie Mellon University. He has been at the University of Pittsburgh since 1983. Dr. Mulvey is a Fellow of both the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society, a recipient of a Faculty Scholar's Award from the William T. Grant Foundation, a member of two MacArthur Foundation Research Networks (one on Mental Health and the Law and another on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice), and a member of the Steering Committee for the National Science Foundation-funded National Consortium on Violence Research. His research has centered on issues related to the use of mental health treatment as a method of social control, primarily focused on how clinicians make judgments regarding the type of risk posed by adult mental patients and juvenile offenders.


Website: http://www.wpic.pitt.edu/research/lap/Ed.html
E-mail: mulveyep@upmc.edu